Submissions for October Issue

It’s been strange summer. Covid is still very much  with us, but people are starting to get together, again and diaries are filling up. Some are looking forward to the Autumn with anticipation, some with dread, and some, perhaps, with a measure of nostalgia for the enforced peace and quietness of the last two years.
Peace and quietness are good, of course, when they are actively chosen – but there is much more to peace than simply being left alone. What are ‘the things that make for peace’ – peace between rivals, strangers or friends; peace with the natural world, or simply peace with yourself?
That is the theme for the Autumn edition of Corncrake.
Think of an incident of compassion, a custom or ritual, a means of working or, a work of art.  Tell us of what it means to you in less than a thousand words. Write a poem or parable, a monologue or memoir, a piece of flash fiction or creative non-fiction – whatever you need to say what you mean. Images and links to video or music are also welcome.
Deadline 30 September

The Spirit of the Place

For the ancient pagans, they say, every sacred place was haunted by a familiar spirit – the genius loci – something less than a god but equally uncanny: some dryad, naiad, elf or goblin. Dinnseanachas or placelore was one of the earliest forms of Irish vernacular writing. Every hill, river and road, sacred or not,  once had its story. They still do. So this issue of Corncrake is all about Place, or rather particular places, and what they mean to people. Continue reading “The Spirit of the Place”